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Session Name Ideas For Serious Games Future: Four Ideas About Where Serious Games Can Go Next
Speaker(s) Noah Falstein, Kevin Harris, Kan Yang Li, Colleen Macklin, Ben Sawyer
Company Name(s) The Inspiracy, University of Wisconsin, Parsons The New School for Design, Parsons the New School for Design, Digitalmill
Track / Format Serious Games Summit
Overview As the serious games matures execution becomes the critical need of what might be called traditional serious games for training, education, and health. As an established field Serious Games must now focus on consistently finding new ideas and endevours to push forward on -- new edges that can open up important opportunities for expansion of the field. This series of short talks provides four ideas that try to add new ideas to an already highly innovative sector.

* Big Dataset Games : As more and more data gets collected what sorts of opportunities lie in using games to help navigate and parse such large datasets?

* Re-imaginging Drill & Skill : Serious games for education and training have often tried to move beyond some of the earliest efforts in education gaming commonly derided as drill & skill. Given that game design ideas have advanced a lot since the advent of both games and robust serious game activity is it time to revisit drill & skill gaming and see if there is room for improvement and innovation?

* Games & Google Wave : Google Wave is still a work in progress but it clearly offers innovation and a new form of group, organizational, and social communication and collaboration. Looking at Wave, with its API, and platform like capabilities is it possible to provide some insight on what new and future game possibilities might be possible on this platform.

* Open Possibility Set Games : Most every computer game arbitrates outcomes based on a finite set of rules and possibility sets. Many activities and problems in the real world require, at times, more complexity, and open possibilities. What would computer games look like if they had to account for a much larger universe of player action and reaction?

GDC 2010

Noah Falstein

The Inspiracy

Kevin Harris

University of Wisconsin

Kan Yang Li

Parsons The New School for Design

Colleen Macklin

Parsons the New School for Design

Ben Sawyer

Digitalmill

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Serious Games Summit

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